Maximising the floating opportunity for ports

John MacAskill, Group Marketing Director, AqualisBraemar LOC
GWEC now forecasts 16.5GW of floating turbines to be in the water by 2030, a significant rise from the 6.5GW it was seeing only a year ago. This is part of a huge growth offshore wind generally with GWEC forecasting 270GW of offshore wind installed by 2030. The opportunity is clear cut. The industrial enabler for floating wind, as it is all offshore wind is an offshore and marine one. This conference has presentations detailing the growth of floating an where that will be; Scotland, Japan, Korea and of course the US West Coast being some of the leading emerging markets and ports are key to the development and realisation of offshore wind. The challenges will range from: -Possible competition from fixed offshore wind -Existing and forecasted port needs -Available capacity, possible capacity and limitations; floating has a large space requirement -Floating needs are still to some degree being clarified and can differ from floater to floater -Available skills -O&M and the possible impact of serial WTG defects While we can ‘leave it to the market’ a first come first served approach will not be optimal and likely hinder regional or national ambitions, so ideally we need to stand back and take a more systemic approach. This presentation will look at what this could look like: Large port versus clustering, what is the starting point of the region/country/market? What are the different construction demands of the main floater concepts? The floating demands from fabrication/manufacturing, marshalling/assembly and O&M and what kinds of modifications, upgrades and enhancements may ports need? The collaborative approach: identifying the stakeholders, educating the demand, supporting ports shape their ‘offer’, giving confidence, ensuring the investment is brought forward in time, …